About Fraser

On 12th May 1996, Fraser Corsan made his first parachute jump on static line from 3,500ft from a cold and windy North Devon Drop Zone. That initial jump had him hooked and several weeks later he made his first freefall, thus started a passion for freefall that would ultimately lead him to fly wingsuits.

It was a moment that had been a lifetime in the making.

From a young age, it was clear to anyone close to him that Fraser belonged in the sky and wanted to jump. He sought a career in the Fleet Air Arm to fulfil his dream of flying the Harrier, however having passed selection he was unable to fly, when he discovered that he was colour blind.

So he found a workaround.

Since his initial career as an Aerospace safety engineer through to his current role in Fujitsu Defence; developing new Business in the Air domain, Fraser has kept his passion alive jumping as much as he can. With multiple freefall qualifications under his belt, he has completed over 2,300 jumps to date, including one with the Space Shuttle Endeavour launching behind him in 2000.

He heard about wingsuit flying in late 2000 and by early 2001 had acquired his own wingsuit and was one of three wingsuit pilots in the UK and about 15 globally at the time to be flying them.

Over 1,300 wingsuit jumps, and 7,800 miles flown later; Fraser is taking on the challenge of a lifetime, travelling to the USA and Canada in May 2017 to make 2 jumps and to break four wingsuit world records and raise £1 million for SSAFA, the Armed Forces charity.

Despite Fraser’s years of experience and qualifications, these world record breaking attempts require specialist skills, dedication and months of intensive training in a custom-built wingsuit built for speed and manoeuvrability. Whilst also addressing the challenges presented by extreme cold and the lack of Oxygen and low ambient pressure.

Fraser has worked closely with the UK Armed Forces his entire career, and is passionate about lending a helping hand to SSAFA in the work they do supporting the Armed Forces, veterans and their families.

It’s an ambitious goal. Break four world records. Change the lives of countless servicemen and their families for the better.

It takes a special kind of person to achieve that. One who is dedicated, steadfast, motivated and born to fly.

1,300 Wingsuit Jumps
55 Hours, 58 Minutes and 43 Seconds in freefall
With an average forward speed of 120mph, Fraser has fallen 7,800 miles